Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition
Twentieth Anniversary Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition
Jonathan Hils, Right Turn, 2005.
Jonathan Hils, Right Turn.
Jonathan Hils, Innate, 2004.
Jonathan Hils, Innate, 2004.
Jonathan Hils, Right Turn, 2005.Jonathan Hils, Right Turn, 2005.
Jonathan Hils, Innate, 2004.
Jonathan Hils, Right Turn, 2005.  Photo taken during installation.
Jonathan Hils, Right Turn, 2005.  Photo taken during installation.Jonathan Hils, Right Turn, 2005.  Photo taken during installation.
Jonathan Hils, Right Turn, 2005.  Photo taken during installation.

Right Turn / Innate

Welded and painted steel

18' 6" x 7' x 5' / 8' 6" x 5' x 5'

Jonathan Hils
Norman, OK
www.jonathanhils.com/

21st Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2007-2008)

Rosen Award 1st Place

Artist's Comments

My particular attraction towards art has always been engaged by the process of construction and the understanding the developing relationships between processes and materials. My work tends to focus on relationships between the natural (or organic) and the scientific or industrial through line, light, organization and varying densities.

Most of my past work has investigated this idea through abstracted natural and industrial forms that alluded to organisms, neurologically or digital pathways, vessels, netting, and other structures that assume an aesthetic based in intricate assemblies. Most of my work is generated by cutting and welding very small pieces of linear steel elements together to create surfaces that resemble something disassociated from the material.

Innate & Right-Turn come from two different bodies of work that employ a similar creative process, but have completely different conceptual motivations.
Jonathan Hils

About the Artist

Jonathan W. Hils, an Associate Professor of Sculpture at the University of Oklahoma, is a native of N.H. and he received his B.F.A. from Georgia State University and his M.F.A. from Tulane. While his works have been exhibited widely across the country in both group and solo shows, he has also completed numerous commissions for private and corporate entities domestically and internationally. In 2010, his solo exhibition "Intersection" was featured at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art and he was also nominated for a United States Artist Fellowship. Jonathan maintains a studio in Norman, Okla. where he teaches sculpture.

For more information, visit www.jonathanhils.com/.

Juror's Comments

Two conceptual sculptures by Jonathan Hils, from two different bodies of work, are included in the exhibition. They have disparate relationships to one another, but also employ similar, technically elaborate processes and materials that communicate various concepts. The process involves the welding of thousands of steel welds to comprise recognizable, yet multifaceted objects. This process creates a mesh of interlinking patterns that invoke webs, arabesque design, lace, net, skeletal forms, and stained lead glass. These patterns are flawlessly fused together to create a veil of transparency that duplicates an organic beauty in cast shadows. In Innate a vessel is turning in on itself working to counteract its own physicality. Elements rhythmically repeat within the structure to present a visual relationship between substance, matter, light, line, and consistency that evokes some type of metamorphosis. In Right Turn, Hils has created a woven shell of a larger-than-life car. Formally rigorous, like Innate, Right Turn is more content heavy. Installed on the outside walls of Wey Hall (the Department of Art), as if driving toward the roof, the car possesses a lofty radiance. The potent of the car is stilled as it provides an additional dimension when one considers the futility of the car, now defying gravity as the wheels and interior of the car are stripped, and just the shell remains. The organic is still present as the delicate patterning reflects onto the white surface of the building. In Right Turn, Hils additionally offers a balance between feminine and masculine associations through a consideration of materials, labor, the decorative, and subject matter. With dexterity, Hils merges process and premise into intricate, yet highly provocative objects.
Shannon Fitzgerald
Independent Curator and Author