Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition
Twentieth Anniversary Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition

10th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (1996-1997)

May 1, 1996 - February 28, 1997

Juror: Bruce White

Curator: Terry Suhre

Juror's Statement

It is a great pleasure to return for the anniversary of the Tenth Martin and Doris Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition. To maintain a continuing exhibition of such quality is no easy task and speaks of the commitment of the Rosen's too, as well as the University's recognition of, the humanizing value of the arts in the educational and daily experience.

The current exhibition typifies public art of the 90's with its diversity of ideas and innovative use of materials. While this would seem only natural to an age witnessing the most rapidly expanding technology the world has ever seen, contemporary sculpture is still, remarkably, overwhelming or mystifying to a large portion of the population who seem to feel "out of touch" with their artist peers. This bewilderment on the part of the viewers is often equally puzzling to the artist - that such a paradox would exist in a generation brought up in a fast moving culture which appears comfortable with the latest novelty in technology, fashion or music.

The lingering notion that a "set of rules" much exist to guide one to understanding the visual arts is as obsolete as saying one cannot listen to music or read a poem without a similar imposition. This is not to deny that the more one knows about anything the greater will be one's appreciation. But must one know the title of a rare and unfamiliar species of a flower, or a captivating piece of music to enjoy the wonder of their existence - the latter a miracle of human creation.

Not too long ago while installing one of my sculptures, this on-site workman released a barrage of expletives directed toward the work. Without letting on, I pretended to question it myself, encouraging him to run his hand over the surface and discover the compound curves and unexpected junctions. At one point I asked him if he had ever found a "touchstone" that felt good in his hand. He responded enthusiastically and seemed to make a connection with the sculpture. Completing the installation, I returned several days later to find my new friend totally exasperated in his attempt to share the experience with his puzzled, and now "culturally disenfranchised," family.

At best a sculpture is the rare and timely expression of the individual who did it - a friend listens, and shares the vision.
Bruce White

Curator's Statement

The display of objects for the purpose of study has been a central part of academic research and study in universities since the seventeenth century. The study of unique and unusual objects was as important as exposure to texts, manuscripts or the master's lectures. During the mid nineteenth century educators in the United States thought exposure to art would benefit the general public, elevating the intellectual and cultural level of the population. Museums and art galleries opened their doors to students, craftspersons and the general public with the intent to provide meaningful educational experiences for a recently prosperous society with increased leisure time.

Today the opportunity to see rare and remarkable objects is not relegated to the museum or art gallery. Images are as available as the newsstand, video store, amusement park, television, or personal computer. Our increasingly technological society puts entertainment and information virtually at our fingertips. So, has the information age made the exhibition an anachronism? What does the exhibition have to offer that hyper-media does not? Ultimately, the choice is between an experience of the simulacrum and the authentic. The strength of the exhibition exists on the premise that there is no substitute for the real thing, no matter how credible the reproduction.

The exhibition, as a mode of communication has a special role for the university gallery or museum. The university's exhibition programs are often the first encounter a student has with actual works of art work, historic pieces, cultural objects and scientific materials. The intimacy of a one-on-one experience, particular to the exhibition, allows for an intellectual and emotional response that is a unique learning experience. A museum or gallery space is the usual site for art exhibition. However, when art moves from the confines of an institution's white walls into public spaces the relationship between the object, the artist and the community changes. Art located in public places affects the dynamics of the space emotionally, intellectually and politically. The result may be celebration or controversy. In either case there may be a polarization of opinion over issues of ownership, money and the representation of community values.

The intent of art in public spaces is to enhance the cultural climate of a community and provide a forum for an exchange of ideas. Those goals are the same whether it is a performance on the plaza of a city, a mural on the wall of a municipal building or sculpture on a university campus. The purpose of the Tenth Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition is to enhance the image of the University as an institution committed to the arts and, most importantly to serve the educational mission of Appalachian State University. The installation of this season's Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition marks a significant milestone. For ten years the Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition has brought to the campus outstanding examples of contemporary American sculpture. Through the continuous support of Martin and Doris Rosen the exhibition has grown in regional and national importance. This year will see the one hundredth work placed on campus. Over the past decade dozens of artists have visited to install their works, lecture and give workshops influencing thousand of students.

Established to broaden the scope of An Appalachian Summer Festival, the Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition is the primary visuals arts component of the festival. Critical to the success of the exhibition is the selection of noted critics, scholars and artists as jurors. The individual vision of past jurors has earned the Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competiton & Exhibition a reputation for consistently strong, challenging and focused shows. The role of an individual juror in selecting the works, rather than a committee, gives each season's exhibition a particular character and spirit.

This diversity of character often results in controversy as visually and intellectually challenging objects are introduced to the campus each year. The early years saw some controversy and misunderstanding as to the intent and sources of support for the exhibition. Today the sculptures are fully integrated into the life of the University. The exhibition is used year round as a teaching tool by classes from many disciplines and the annual installations of the next season's works is a much anticipated event. The exhibition has also acted as training for students who have gone on to work in art related fields. Assisting the gallery in the organization of the annual exhibition and later with the artists themselves provides students with insight in the working of the art world. The exhibition has made it possible for many sculptors to take the next step in their careers. The Martin and Doris Rosen Awards have allowed the winning artists to upgrade equipment, improve their working space and to travel.

The exhibition program of museums and art galleries has long been a part of first rate university curriculums. Today all across the country the value of art and exhibitions addressing cultural issues is questioned. Municipal, state and university museums and art galleries are under pressure to justify their existence. Institutions are scaling back their educational programs, canceling exhibitions, reducing operating hours and releasing staff in the name of fiscal and political necessity. The withdrawal of corporate, state, local and federal support of the arts is not about economics. It is about control of our cultural institutions and definition of our value systems. Art in public places runs counter to any agenda that restricts dialogue. Therefore, it is especially important, today, that programs such as the Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition remain a part of the University to challenge students and spark debate and interest into new areas of inquiry. Appalachian State University is especially fortunate to have a program like the Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition to enrich its community and to have the unconditional support of enlightened patrons like Martin and Doris Rosen.
Terry Suhre
Gallery Director
Catherine J. Smith Gallery
Appalachian State University

Credits / Acknowledgements

On view year round, the Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition and Exhibition is recognized as a dynamic component of the visual arts not only for Appalachian State University but across our region as well. The realization of programs such as this is possible through the participation of many talented and dedicated persons. It has been my pleasure to work on many installations during my tenure with ASU. I am most grateful to all who made this opportunity possible.

On behalf of An Appalachian Summer, the Office of Cultural Affairs, and the Catherine Smith Gallery I want to express our gratitude to all of the artists who participated in this year's competition and congratulate those selected for the exhibition. We appreciate the artist's efforts in making these works available to our community during the upcoming year. I wish to offer our sincerest thanks to our juror, Bruce White, for accepting the difficult challenge of adjudicating this year's competition and commend him for selecting these outstanding works.

A generous annual gift from Martin and Doris Rosen makes the sculpture competition possible. Mr. and Mrs. Rosen continue to be a major force contributing to the cultural climate of the University and Northwest North Carolina. We are most grateful for their support and wish to extend our deepest appreciation.

I want to take this opportunity to thank my colleagues in the Office of Cultural Affairs; Perry Mixter, Director for the Office of Cultural Affairs; Gil Morgenstern, Artistic Director for An Appalachian Summer; Sali Gill-Johnson, General Manger; Sara Heustess, Box Office Manager for Farthing Auditorium; Greg Williams, Technical Director for Farthing Auditorium; Jim Sigmon, Assistant Technical Director for Farthing Auditorium; Denise Weissberg, Director of Marketing and Public Relations; Elizabeth Loflin, Assistant Director of Marketing and Public Relations; and Sandra Black, Fiscal Officer. I also wish to acknowledge the support of Judy Humphrey, Interim Chair for the Department of Art; Dr. Clyde Robbins, Assistant Vice-Chancellor for Physical Plant Operations; Larry Bordeaux, Director of Facility Support Services; Douglas Canipe, Plant Maintenance Supervisor; Jim Bryan Grounds Supervisor; Evan Row, Safety Officer. I greatly appreciate their advice and encouragement.

My thanks to those whose skills and talents made this publication possible, including Michael Fanizza for providing an excellent design for this exhibition catalogue, Kim Johnson for coming back on board at the best possible time and Hank T. Foreman, for his hard work, good humor and friendship over the years.

To all of the above I extend my sincerest gratitude.

Terry Suhre

Exhibits 1 - 10 of 10

Center Device

Center Device
Steel, Stone, and Cement

Harold "Skip" Van Houten

10th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (1996-1997)
Rosen Award 1st Place

Award Winner
Being: The End of Becoming

Being: The End of Becoming
Granite

J. Paul Sires

10th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (1996-1997)

Divination of Mystery

Divination of Mystery
Marble

Be Gardiner

10th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (1996-1997)

On Display NowPermanent Collection
Dual

Dual
Clay

Robert Wood

10th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (1996-1997)

Immigrant Gate

Immigrant Gate
Steel

Jim Gallucci

10th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (1996-1997)

Nomadic

Nomadic
Mixed Media

Robert Taormina

10th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (1996-1997)

Ornythopterus

Ornythopterus
Painted Steel

John Parker

10th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (1996-1997)

Root Dancer

Root Dancer
Stone, Steel, and Bronze

Glenn Zweygardt

10th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (1996-1997)

Something About a Journey

Something About a Journey
Steel

Carl Billingsley

10th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (1996-1997)

Untitled

Untitled
Polyester

Marcia Kaplan

10th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (1996-1997)

Exhibits 1 - 10 of 10

Legend: Award Winner- Award Winner On Display Now- On Display Now Permanent Collection- Permanent Collection