Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition
Twentieth Anniversary Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition

20th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2006-2007)

April 16, 2006 - March 1, 2007

Juror: Michael Klein

Curator: Hank T. Foreman

Assistant Curator: Brook Bower

2006-2007 Site Map & Price List (PDF 172K)

Welcome to the Twentieth Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition and Exhibition. With great pride, we celebrate this milestone anniversary for one of our most exciting visual arts programs on campus. This program, used as a model by arts organizations throughout the country, has always been about partnership - partnership with Martin and Doris Rosen, without whom it could not be possible; partnership with the wonderful artists who have joined the competition and those who have been selected for the exhibition; and partnership with those who have worked tirelessly behind the scenes. On behalf of the Appalachian Family, I extend my congratulations and deepest thanks to all of you.

Appalachian State University is honored to host this twentieth installation of sculptures which brings ten new outstanding public works of art to our community, and over the years has been responsible for installing more than 200 sculptures on the campus. The university has been acknowledged for its public art and we are pleased to continue to use our campus as a venue for works from creative artists all around the country. Enjoy!

Dr. Kenneth E. Peacock
Chancellor, Appalachian State University

Juror's Statement

What has sculpture become?

Over the course of the last twenty years sculpture has become a more popular, widely discussed and accepted form of art making. It is now the most radical of arts since by definition it encompasses a wealth of approaches, styles, materials and formats. Where casting and carving were the skills associated with sculpture in the past, the definition of the activity would today include almost any action where three dimensional forms were employed. And its proponents no longer distinguish necessarily between figurative or abstract but look to work that somehow resonates with the time in which we are live.

There has been a kind of cultural about face when it comes to sculpture. It has lost much of its macho look and power, to be replaced by a range of approaches and attitudes that focus on the more conceptual side of art making and still brings to bear abstract and figurative ideals as well as architectural assumptions. The openness and freedom is at times overwhelming but it suggests a grand democracy in which all parts of the art equation must be equally considered and included.

With the emergence of environmental and site specific works in the 60s and 70s, the general growth of public art projects and budgets and the building of new museums and gardens the possibilities for sculptors and their vision has grown exponentially. At the same time the radical movements of the previous century whether in the area of Cubism, Futurism or Surrealism all had their sculptural side or hero from Picasso to Boccioni and Man Ray but today that sense of impending stylistic movements or identifiable historic periods has given way to very individual, very personal and at times national talents and responses.

The world has shrunk, or gone flat as the noted journalist Thomas L. Friedman has reported in his 2005 book and in proportion to this phenomenon the borders of style and culture have opened so that the crosscurrents of exchange are ever present. The studio, once the haven for work and ideas, can now be anywhere and production can be any place. The sculptor is a citizen of the world, a practitioner of a myriad of crafts and purveyor of numerous talents called to problem solve and then build.

The definition of what sculpture is has altered too; nothing is left outside the realm of possibilities when sculpture is concerned or sculptors are asked to become engaged with a site, a location, a gallery space or an institution. The emergence of installation works in the last decade as the sine qua non of contemporary art practice owes a great deal to the emergence and legacy of the alternative spaces of the 70s and the energy and passion of contemporary artists willing to build and then see demolished temporary installations. P.S. 1 in New York and 112 Greene Street became the role models for such endeavors in the days before commercial galleries existed or even presented new art. Such organizations, and they grew rapidly across the U.S., were the laboratories for the experiments which would lay the ground work for the creative explosion of the 80s and 90s. By the 80s sculpture was rich, broad, figurative or abstract but generally accepted. It was imagined in a variety of materials, whether these were wood, metal or steel or were inclusive of the developing technologies of video media and computers. In scale sculpture could be Lilliputian or Gargantuan--limited only by budget, skill and ultimately imagination. And most significantly sculpture was now something addressed to an international audience of collectors, critics and curators: German, English and Japanese artists sculptors such as Franz Erhard Walther, Tony Cragg and Tadashi Kawamata were suddenly showing in New York, Los Angeles, and Dallas and American sculptors such as Mark di Suvero, Jonathan Borofsky and Jenny Holzer were being invited to present works in Paris, Muenster and Moscow.

In the decade of the 90s the equation of sculpture became politicized as the content of works addressed social, political and economic issues facing both the artistic community but also communities around the globe. The questions raised by the artist in their respective work or charging the audience to grasp as a result of the work. Race, gender and ethnicity were at the center of the dialogue and debate; the formal apparatus to express these ideas and explore these issues was not a pictorial one as had been in the past but had become sculptural one. Fred Wilson and Elaine Reichek for example, saw the means to this end in dramatic and prosaic installations which explored through objects both found and made the salient issues of their cultural backgrounds. And the political nature of art making and the art business continues to be of great importance especially to sculptors since their work certainly depends upon support from a broad and diverse spectrum of individuals working in either the public or private sectors.

In the first decade of the 21st century everything and anything remains possible.

The Turchin Center's sculpture program is a great example of this new almost ideal climate. The exhibition program is based on a strategy that thinks globally but acts locally. This 20th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition and Exhibition serves to bring to the community, the region and the state examples of what is happening "in the field". The diversity of styles and approaches represented here reflects the wider and on going shifts that the interested viewer will find in galleries and museums across the country. It also illustrates very much what sculpture can be.
Michael Klein
Previous Executive Director
International Sculpture Center (ISC)

About the Juror

Michael Klein, previous Executive Director of International Sculpture Center (ISC), is a highly regarded writer, curator and arts program director who will serve as the Juror for the 20th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition and Exhibition. Klein went to the ISC in January 2005 from Microsoft, where he served as curator of their art collection since 1999. For the previous six years, he owned the Michael Klein Gallery in New York, where he was instrumental in the early careers of artists such as Cindy Sherman, Robert Longo and James Casebere, as well as Beverly Semmes, Matt Mullican, Jene Highstein, Elaine Reichek and Rita McBride. Klein has been extensively published and has been a regular contributor to Sculpture Magazine since 1996.

As an independent curator and writer, Klein has organized exhibitions specializing in contemporary and 20th century art topics, as well as authored catalog essays, presented public lectures and served as corporate consultant for art acquisitions, commissions and collection management. In addition to regular submissions to Sculpture Magazine, Klein has contributed over seventy-five essays, reviews and feature articles to Art in America, ArtNews, Drawing, World Art and The Art Book, among others. Michael Klein is a member of the College Art Association, on the Advisory Board of On the Boards in Seattle, WA, and on the National Advisory Committee of Graphicstudio at the University of South Florida, Tampa.

About the Curator

Hank Foreman serves as Assistant Vice Chancellor of Arts and Cultural Affairs as well as Director and Chief Curator of the Turchin Center for the Visual Arts for Appalachian State University. He obtained his M.A. in Art Education from Appalachian, having completed undergraduate studies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, with a concentration in Painting and Sculpture. His duties include the administrative responsibilities for An Appalachian Summer Festival, the Performing Arts Series, Farthing Auditorium and the Turchin Center for the Visual Arts.

During his tenure at Appalachian State, Foreman has taken part in the organization of numerous exhibitions, including the associated lectures, symposia, and publications. He has worked closely with the university's Department of Art, and a wide variety of other campus and community groups, to make gallery resources available to all. One of his earliest exhibitions at Appalachian, Views From Ground Level: Art and Ecology in the Late Nineties, brought internationally acclaimed artists, historians, and critics to the campus and received national attention.

Foreman is also an exhibiting studio artist, and participates in regional and national conferences as a presenter and panelist.

About the Assistant Curator

Brook Bower serves as the assistant curator and administrator for the Turchin Center for the Visual Arts and its staff. She received a BS in Art Management and a BFA in Ceramics from Appalachian State University’s Department of Art in 2001. Bower’s professional activities include curating exhibitions, lecturing, consulting for competition management, serving as a juror for local competitions, mentoring future art management students and managing several national art competitions including the Rosen Sculpture Competition, the Halpert Biennial and the Appalachian Mountain Photography Competition. Bower also serves as the Acting Registrar, providing collections management support for the Turchin Center’s Permanent Collection containing 1,481+ objects and managing the Intra-Campus Loan Program.

Following her undergraduate degrees, she has concentrated on furthering her education by attending conferences, courses and workshops expanding her knowledge of curatorship, exhibition design, and collections management. Bower recently participated in the 2011 SEMC Jekyll Island Management Institute and is currently seeking a Master of Visual Arts Administration, with a focus in curatorial studies, at New York University in New York City. She serves on multiple committees that concentrate on community enhancement utilizing the visual arts and serves as the faculty advisor for the Arts Management Organization (AMO). In addition, Bower is an active exhibiting artist.

Credits / Acknowledgements

On behalf of An Appalachian Summer Festival, the Office of Arts and Cultural Programs, and the Turchin Center for the Visual Arts, I wish to thank all of the artists participating in this year's competition and congratulate those chosen for the exhibition. Each year the Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition and Exhibition is made possible by the generous support of Martin and Doris Rosen. The Rosens are tireless supporters of the arts, and over the years, have given so much of themselves to ensure that the arts become a more integral part of our community. Their excitement and dedication serve as both inspiration and role model. I would like to thank our juror, Michael Klein, for his vision and commitment to selecting a group of significant works for this
milestone year.

A heartfelt word of thanks goes to all of this year's artists for submitting such a wonderful and diverse range of work. Special thanks goes to this year's Graphic Designer - Catherine "Sunny" Davies, Photographers - Troy Tuttle and Tasha Nunn. Documentation of these exhibitions is such an important aspect of our program. Thanks goes to our Webmaster - Pete Montaldi, for his dedication to preserving the mages and documentation from the past 20 years on the Rosen sculpture website. We extend a very heartfelt thank you to our exhibition Practicum III students: Clare Evans and Taylor Leaf; Exhibitions II students: Jennifer Livingston, Sara Gordon, Joel Lancaster, Dayna Seman, and Emilie Skytta; TCVA Staff: Brook Bower - Assistant
Curator, Tasha Nunn - Program Assistant, Paul Grant - Visitor Services, Dr.Gayle Weitz - TCVA Community Arts School Coordinator, Karen Brown - Membership Coordinator, and Sharon Yates - Program Assistant; and our colleagues in the Office of Arts and Cultural Programs and the OACP's Marketing Team, Megan Hayes and Kelly Broman-Fulks, for all of their hard work and support in helping to make this exhibition a success. Also thanks to the Department of Art's Sonny Struss and Joe Bigley for their patience and expertise.

Installation on college campus requires a great deal of inter-departmental collaboration, and my thanks goes to Jim Bryan - Grounds Superintendent, Evan Rowe and Beth Clark - Safety Officers, the entire Grounds Department of the Appalachian State University Physical Plant for their cooperation and expertise and for making our campus a beautiful venue for outdoor sculpture.

Hank T. Foreman
Director & Chief Curator

Exhibits 1 - 10 of 10

Block Island Hangout

Block Island Hangout
Ceramic

Jeff Downing

20th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2006-2007)
Rosen Award 1st Place

Award Winner
3 Ton 1 Ton

3 Ton 1 Ton
Cast iron and steel

Harold "Skip" Van Houten

20th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2006-2007)

Appalachian Shade

Appalachian Shade
Cinder block wall and canopies

Martine Kaczynski

20th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2006-2007)

Column to Brancusi in the High Federal Style

Column to Brancusi in the High Federal Style
Slipcast porcelin and steel

Darryl Lauster

20th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2006-2007)

Flaneur

Flaneur
SPF construction grade lumber

Stanley Wrzyszczynski

20th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2006-2007)

Four Part Harmony

Four Part Harmony
Steel

Carl Billingsley

20th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2006-2007)

Moonflower

Moonflower
Fiberglass

Christopher Ray

20th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2006-2007)

Surplus XV

Surplus XV
Plastic and steel

Tom Matthews

20th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2006-2007)

Watch Your Head

Watch Your Head
Steel

Gordon Chandler

20th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2006-2007)

Withering Marker

Withering Marker
Steel

Margery Evelyn Albertini

20th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2006-2007)

Exhibits 1 - 10 of 10

Legend: Award Winner- Award Winner