Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition
Twentieth Anniversary Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition

15th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2001-2002)

May 1, 2001 - February 28, 2002

Juror: Richard Hunt

Curator: Hank T. Foreman

About the Juror

From the South side of Chicago and the deep depression of 1935, Richard Hunt has sculpted his way in to the canons of 20th century American Modern Art history. Today, the South side of Chicago continues to claim him, as the state of Illinois, the nation, and the international world of modern art proclaim him.

His career, which spans fifty years, has resulted in a prolific body of work which he refers to as his "drawings in space." The physicality of his chosen medium is consistent with the industrial mid west. He forsakes the genteel canvas for steel, anvils, and the welder's flame. He "draws in space" with metals of aluminum, bronze, copper, and steel; cutting, hammering, burning, and sanding the metal, transforming crude materials into exquisite sculptures and majestic public art monuments.

Richard Hunt was appointed, by President Lyndon Johnson, to serve as one of the first artists on the governing board of the National Endowment for the Arts. He has continued to serve on the board of the quintessential art institutions in America and abroad; including the Board of Trustees for the Ravinia Festival, Museum of Comtemporary Art, Chicago; American Academy in Rome; National Board of Directors, Smithsonian Institute; and the esteemed American Academy of Arts and Letters. His professorships and artist residencies include Yale University, Purdue University, Cornell University, and Harvard University.

Richard Hunt is a preeminent American sculptor at the apex of a prolific and successful career. His work includes gallery-scale sculptures displayed and collected by major museums, and over 100 large-scale public art commissions created for American cities, campuses, and corporations. This body of work is immediately recognizable by Hunt's evocative forms which fuse the man-made with the natural, melding the gritty muscularity of America's industrial-urban environment with Hunt's passion for natural forms and biology. In source and in content they bridge European Modernism with the art of African blacksmiths and integrate ancient mythology with African-American literary and musical traditions. Potent from such broad and diverse sources, the sculptures resonate with multiple layers of meaning, giving voice to America's unique hybridized cultural experience.

Hunt's art is the product of transformation, improvisation, and regeneration firmly rooted in multiple histories and traditions, and always moving forward in positive ways.

B.E. Noel, President
Noel Gallery Fine Art Acquisitions, Inc.
July 2001

Richard Hunt is represented in the Southeast United States by Noel Gallery in Charlotte, North Carolina. They provided the images of of Mr. Hunt's work shown on this page.

Curator's Statement

For nine years I have had the privilege of working with the Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition and Exhibition. It is hard to believe, but that means during my tenure here I have seen 90 public sculptures go up as part of this exciting program. To date there have been 150 exhibited, and the permanent collection is growing to complement this annual exhibition. Thousands of people have participated in guided tours and lectures, and many more have experienced the artworks as they go about their everyday lives.

As I think about my years with the Rosen program, the first thing that comes to mind is the way this program has brought art into the lives of the community. I remember the people who were moved by a particular work. I remember the people who were intrigued by the mechanical ingenuity exhibited by a particular work. I remember the people who struggled to meet the challenge of new or thematically tough work. I remember the winter when Rosen Award Winner R.F. Buckley's forged aluminum bed mysteriously became inhabited by a dapper set of snow people. I remember the smiles of pedestrians as they watched a vacant area filled with a new sculpture. I remember the crowd forming when Charles, "the crane guy," took a sculpture up a little higher than required for dramatic effect. These memories, and the hundreds more, combine to reinforce my understanding of how this program has made a difference in the artistic life of the campus and community.

The opportunity to see new works, investigate their meaning and design, and the ability to re-experience them over the period of a year is an important aspect of this program. Unlike many exhibited works, these pieces become part of our lives for a year. This is the power and vitality of public art. However, this power comes at a price.

Public art ... or for our purposes, outdoor sculpture ... is often a risky proposition. Art displayed in a gallery is usually viewed by people whose express purpose is to look at art. While the viewer might not connect with certain works, they are in the frame of mind to see what art is displayed. Outdoor works occupy the same "real" time and space as we do everyday. The artist or gallery - outside of providing catalogues, signs, and tours - for the most part does not have the opportunity to place works within a context or to even ensure that viewers are prepared to view art. This is the first risk ... that certain members of the public won't adjust their everyday mindset to properly consider the works.

The next risk is the flip side of a positive aspect. When art works are placed in the public realm the public often feels ownership of the works. Positively, this means that the works will be more accessible - not only physically but conceptually. Negatively, this means that the possibility exists for viewers to overstep their bounds. This happens when the public fails to acknowledge that art works are created by an artist, and, in addition to it's designed communicative worth, they are their worthwhile property. These works are the fruits of the artist's lives, and sharing them in such a public way is a very daring act.

Finally, placing works in the public domain can open artists and galleries up to severe scrutiny. Each have to be aware of this possibility and be prepared to deal with the situation in a way that respects the public concern and the integrity of their work. If handled correctly, this dialogue can make the program more meaningful for everyone concerned.

In closing, I offer my sincere admiration to the artists, this university, and Martin and Doris Rosen for meeting the challenges of public art. It must also be noted, that a huge amount of admiration must be bestowed upon the public for their participation in the exhibition of these 150 outdoor works. The rare instances when members of the public failed to live up to the challenge before them are far outweighed by their positive participation in this program.
Hank T. Foreman
Director & Chief Curator
Turchin Center for the Visual Arts

About the Curator

Hank Foreman serves as Assistant Vice Chancellor of Arts and Cultural Affairs as well as Director and Chief Curator of the Turchin Center for the Visual Arts for Appalachian State University. He obtained his M.A. in Art Education from Appalachian, having completed undergraduate studies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, with a concentration in Painting and Sculpture. His duties include the administrative responsibilities for An Appalachian Summer Festival, the Performing Arts Series, Farthing Auditorium and the Turchin Center for the Visual Arts.

During his tenure at Appalachian State, Foreman has taken part in the organization of numerous exhibitions, including the associated lectures, symposia, and publications. He has worked closely with the university's Department of Art, and a wide variety of other campus and community groups, to make gallery resources available to all. One of his earliest exhibitions at Appalachian, Views From Ground Level: Art and Ecology in the Late Nineties, brought internationally acclaimed artists, historians, and critics to the campus and received national attention.

Foreman is also an exhibiting studio artist, and participates in regional and national conferences as a presenter and panelist.

Credits / Acknowledgements

On behalf of An Appalachian Summer Festival, the Office of Cultural Affairs, and the Catherine J. Smith Gallery, I wish to thank all of the artist who participated in this year's competition and congratulate those chosen for the exhibition. Each year the Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition and Exhibition is made possible by the generous support of Martin and Doris Rosen. The Rosens are tireless supporters of the arts, and over the years have given so much of themselves to ensure that the arts became a more integral part of our community. Their excitement and dedication serve as both inspiration and role model. I would like to thank our juror, Richard Hunt, for his dedication and professionalism during the completion of his difficult task. I wish to thank my colleagues in the Office of Cultural Affairs, my colleagues in the Art Department, and the students who participated in the installations. Special thanks to our designer - Mike Fanizza, photographer - Christopher Bledsoe, Assistant to the Gallery Director - Brook Greene, the folks at Boone Crane, and our interns Heather Cadmus and Hillary Frye. A heartfelt thanks to Jim Bryan - Grounds Superintendent, and to Evan Rowe - Safety Officer. We also extend our thanks to the entire Grounds Department of the Appalachian State University Physical Plant. Their cooperation and expertise continues to make our campus a beautiful venue for outdoor sculpture. A special thank you goes out to Sonny Struss, Department of Art Studio Technician, for his expert assistance and his generous spirit.

Hank T. Foreman

Exhibits 1 - 10 of 10

Prometheus (still stealing fire)

Prometheus (still stealing fire)
Steel

Dennis Peacock

15th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2001-2002)
Rosen Award 1st Place

Award Winner
Cash Crop

Cash Crop
Mixed Media

Severn Eaton

15th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2001-2002)

Dream Deferred

Dream Deferred
Steel

Robert Spinazzola

15th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2001-2002)

Emergent Force

Emergent Force
Stoneware Clay

Robert Pulley

15th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2001-2002)

Feminea Vitalitas

Feminea Vitalitas
Polyester Resin and Steel

Dora Natella

15th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2001-2002)

Keepsake

Keepsake
Bronze

Scott Wallace

15th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2001-2002)

Learn to Swim

Learn to Swim
Steel and Granite

Brett Hunter

15th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2001-2002)

Mass

Mass
Welded Painted Steel

Ann Melanie

15th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2001-2002)

Texas Two-Step

Texas Two-Step
Steel, Paint, and Found Objects

Robbie Barber

15th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2001-2002)

Totemic XX

Totemic XX
Welded Aluminum and Copper Sheets

Glenn Phifer

15th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2001-2002)

Exhibits 1 - 10 of 10

Legend: Award Winner- Award Winner