Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition
Twentieth Anniversary Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition

16th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2002-2003)

May 1, 2002 - February 28, 2003

Juror: Kerry Brougher

Curator: Hank T. Foreman

Juror's Statement

Marcel Duchamp once said that art didn't interest him, artists did. Although it would be hard for a museum professional who loves objects to totally embrace such a philosophy, there is nevertheless something to Duchamp's protest. What Duchamp meant was that it was the idea behind the object that was as important as the resultant object itself; for without those ideas, objects would in fact not be art.

It's comforting to know that good ideas are still in abundance. They are certainly in evidence here at the 2002-2003 Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition. The entries in this year's competition demonstrated a wide array of approaches to sculpture and were distinguished by compelling creativity. For a curator, this was enormously gratifying, but it also made the jurying process that much more difficult. Ultimately the diverse styles and sensibilities of the artists allowed for the creation of an exhibition that demonstrates the openness of sculpture today, the way it has expanded to include a variety of forms and materials - and above all, a multiplicity of ideas.
Kerry Brougher
Chief Curator
Hirshborn Museum & Sculpture Garden
Smithsonian Institute

Curator's Statement

As I prepared to write this essay, I grappled with how to approach this annual privilege from a new direction. Then my mind drifted back over past years; the artists, the great works, and the jurors whose decisions shaped the exhibition. It was then that it hit me. Each juror brings their own personal and professional history with them to the daunting task of choosing ten works from a slew of entries. Each of them have such insight and are able to help us see the world of outdoor sculpture through changed eyes. For this reason, I have chosen to revisit statements made by past jurors, and expand upon their relevance to our relationship with this unique brand of public art.

Jesus Bautista Moroles - 8th Rosen Juror states, "The finalists obviously represent a subjective viewpoint which echoes my personal belief that outdoor sculpture should encourage the viewer to investigate, to explore, and to interact." This simple statement sheds a great deal of light on how Moroles understands his role as juror, and interprets the role of public art. His reference to "subjective viewpoint" and "personal belief" let us know that he not only acknowledges his background and experiences when viewing art, but recognizes that they are additional tools employed by him to relate to works of art. His view of outdoor sculpture is one of a dynamic dialogue. The work, by its very nature, should be an instigator of conversation between it and the viewer. Employing this understanding empowers us to each make our own relationship with public art and, while it might not be the same as the next person's relationship, it is a valid way to begin living with a work of art.

In a statement equally freeing to the public art viewer, Bruce White - 10th Rosen Juror says, "The lingering notion that a 'set of rules' must exist to guide one to understanding the visual arts is as obsolete as saying one cannot listen to music or read a poem without a similar imposition. This is not to deny that the more one knows about anything the greater will be one's appreciation." Here White realizes that becoming an informed viewer is a good thing, but it is an ongoing process enhanced by viewing art often. One needn't feel the pressure to learn everything at once. Visit a work of public art. Get to know it. Relate to it on that given day, and as you become more informed in the future your appreciation will deepen.

"(Sculpture)reminds us that we stand on the ground, that we walk with our legs, that we feel touch through our skin, that we track constant shifts of light with our eyes, and that with every breath and step our feeling of tension, relaxation, compression, expansion, sadness and joy." These words by 11th Rosen juror Jackie Brookner place emphasis on the physical relationship between our bodies and public art. The simple fact is that we occupy the same three-dimensional space, and that outdoor sculpture brings the activity of viewing art to a more sensory level than other art viewing might provide. Added to this is the possibility of experiencing art over a long period of time. Because public art can become part of our daily lives, we are afforded the opportunity to view it through physical, environmental and our own psychological/intellectual shifts.

In his essay, 12th Rosen Juror John Perreault says, "The artwork whether indoor or outdoor, portable or site-specific, must speak to your heart as well as your intelligence." Here Perreault emphasizes that art cannot be viewed through theory, concept or craft alone. Once embroiled in a dialogue with an artwork, just as with people, emotions come into play. I know, as a juror, on some occasions the first connection with a work can be based on an emotional response. It is then necessary to move past that response to deal with the construction at hand. This does not invalidate the emotional response, rather it tends to deepen the appreciation of well-designed and meaningful art.

"Occupying a space between architecture - representing our need to separate and protect ourselves from the unknown - and nature - the unknown with which we are always trying to reconcile - sculpture offers a creative potential through which we can understand our ever-shifting position in the world." These words by 14th Rosen Juror Kathryn Hixson hint at the many roles outdoor sculpture can assume. These roles (like gathering place, relaxation space, and resting place) are often facilitated by the artwork's placement within a specific environment. However, no matter what role the sculpture fulfills at any given time, it is this occupation of space between nature and architecture that draws people toward the work and an evolving experience.

Through the words of these jurors we begin to understand the complexities of outdoor sculpture. It is a part of our environment and initiates physical, intellectual and emotional dialogue. To participate in this dialogue, we should strive to become informed, however, we should also understand that the sculpture itself can often be the best teacher if we only listen. The task of the juror can seem overwhelming. The number of entries to be viewed, and then the number of entries that must be narrowed down to the chosen few often create difficulty. The fact remains; the process itself is not difficult. There is great joy in serving as a juror ... the joy that comes from having the opportunity to dialogue with so much good art. It simply means coming to the work prepared to think, feel and learn, and, as these jurors have pointed out, that is all it really takes for any of us.
Hank T. Foreman
Director & Chief Curator
Turchin Center for the Visual Arts

About the Curator

Hank Foreman serves as Assistant Vice Chancellor of Arts and Cultural Affairs as well as Director and Chief Curator of the Turchin Center for the Visual Arts for Appalachian State University. He obtained his M.A. in Art Education from Appalachian, having completed undergraduate studies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, with a concentration in Painting and Sculpture. His duties include the administrative responsibilities for An Appalachian Summer Festival, the Performing Arts Series, Farthing Auditorium and the Turchin Center for the Visual Arts.

During his tenure at Appalachian State, Foreman has taken part in the organization of numerous exhibitions, including the associated lectures, symposia, and publications. He has worked closely with the university's Department of Art, and a wide variety of other campus and community groups, to make gallery resources available to all. One of his earliest exhibitions at Appalachian, Views From Ground Level: Art and Ecology in the Late Nineties, brought internationally acclaimed artists, historians, and critics to the campus and received national attention.

Foreman is also an exhibiting studio artist, and participates in regional and national conferences as a presenter and panelist.

Credits / Acknowledgements

On behalf of An Appalachian Summer Festival, the Office of Cultural Affairs, and the Catherine J. Smith Gallery, I wish to thank all of the artists participating in this year's competition and congratulate those chosen for the exhibition. Each year the Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition and Exhibition is made possible by the generous support of Martin and Doris Rosen. The Rosens are tireless supporters of the arts, and over the years, have given so much of themselves to ensure that the arts became a more integral part of our community. Their excitement and dedication serves as both inspiration and role model. I would like to thank our juror, Kerry Brougher, for his dedication and professionalism during the completion of his difficult task. I wish to thank my colleagues in the Office of Cultural Affairs, in the Art Department, and the students who participated in the installations. Special thanks to our designer - Michael Fanizza, photographer - Christopher Bledsoe, Program Assistant - Brook Greene, the folks at Boone Crane, and our student help - Sean Matthews. A heartfelt thanks to Jim Bryan - Grounds Superintendent, Evan Rowe - Safety Officer, the entire Grounds Department of the Appalachian State University Physical Plant, and to the grounds crew - who took the time out of their own busy schedules to help with installing David Tillinghast's site specific sculpture. Their cooperation and expertise continues to make our campus a beautiful venue for outdoor sculpture.

Hank T. Foreman

Exhibits 1 - 10 of 10

The Stinging Bee

The Stinging Bee
Earth, Steel Ball, Bronze, and Hollow Space

David Tillinghast

16th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2002-2003)
Rosen Award 1st Place

Award WinnerOn Display NowRosen Sculpture Loan Program
FS.919 Barn

FS.919 Barn
Galvanized Steel

Rudy Rudisill

16th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2002-2003)

Grove

Grove
Stainless Steel

Gretchen Lothrop

16th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2002-2003)

Homestead

Homestead
Cedar

Susana Jones

16th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2002-2003)

Kazimoc XXX

Kazimoc XXX
Steel and Stainless Steel

Rodney Carroll

16th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2002-2003)

Kyoto & Beyond

Kyoto & Beyond
Corten Steel

Wayne Trapp

16th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2002-2003)

Sundance

Sundance
Steel and Paint

Hanna Jubran

16th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2002-2003)

Totemic XIX

Totemic XIX
Welded Aluminum and Copper Plated Steel

Glenn Phifer

16th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2002-2003)

Turbine

Turbine
Found Wood

Ryan Goff

16th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2002-2003)

Unity

Unity
Bronze Coated Steel

Greg Mueller

16th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (2002-2003)

On Display NowPermanent Collection

Exhibits 1 - 10 of 10

Legend: Award Winner- Award Winner On Display Now- On Display Now Permanent Collection- Permanent Collection Rosen Sculpture Loan Program- Rosen Sculpture Loan Program