Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition
Twentieth Anniversary Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition

13th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (1999-2000)

May 1, 1999 - February 29, 2000

Juror: Michael Dunbar

Curator: Hank T. Foreman

Juror's Statement

Michael Dunbar

Michael Dunbar

I am honored to have had the opportunity to serve as the juror for the 13th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition and Exhibition. Thanks to Hank Foreman for inviting me to view this year's entries and pass judgment. Thanks also to Kim Johnson for all her efforts arranging for my visit.

Through the ongoing support of the Rosen family, Appalachian State University has established a rich tradition of exhibiting three-dimensional art work in the most pleasant of settings. Nestled against the backdrop of the Blue Ridge Mountains, this show has become an important venue for contemporary sculptors. The response to the call for entries this year was exceptional with artists responding in both number and quality. Although this response makes the juror's job that much more challenging, it also results in a very strong exhibition.

My role as the juror is to provide a fresh perspective on the exhibit and the artists who enter. Initially, my concerns address basic issues of presence, scale, execution, visual impact, concept, safety, durability, and the collective appearance of the exhibit. The more difficult challenge is to identify from the exhibit the one work of art to be awarded special recognition. In this case I chose to select a work of art that addressed this unique setting, was sensitive to the heritage of the community and made a powerful visual statement.

This year's Martin and Doris Rosen Award has been presented to Joe Thompson for his site specific sculpture Wisdom-Knowledge. Responding to the visual references of the surrounding area, this year's winner keyed into the distinct green metal roof of the campus architecture to culminate a formalized containment of rocks, farm implements, household relics, and a school desk. These are all assembled in an exposed stratification that calls to mind the geology, population, occupation, and institution previously and currently associated with the site.

I have also requested a Juror's Award of Special Merit be awarded to Judy Strahota for her construction titled Support Where Most Needed. Aside from the obvious parody of scale and subject, both the construction and attention to detail in this piece are exemplary.

Congratulations to Joe Thompson, Judy Strahota, and all the artists of the 13th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition and Exhibition. It has been a pleasure to experience this exhibit and setting as a juror.
Michael Dunbar

Curator's Statement

The Catherine J. Smith Gallery and An Appalachian Summer Festival are proud to present the 13th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition. The diversity of materials, techniques, and content makes this an exciting and challenging exhibition. Through the years, the Rosen program has sought to make an impact mainly on two groups of people.

First, the exhibition's goal is to bring sculpture into the lives of as many viewers as possible. With tours, special presentations, and materials made available to any classroom or group upon request, the Rosen program has broadened its outreach, and has afforded many new people with the opportunity to investigate outdoor sculpture. Certainly for those of us who circulate around the works, the program brings public art to us every day.

Second, the competition and exhibition seeks to positively impact the lives of artists by creating a premier venue for exhibition, providing documentation materials like catalogues, and offering awards for outstanding work. From its conception, the program has met the exhibition needs of sculptors. Over the years, there seem to be less exhibition opportunities for artists creating large-scale outdoor work, and the Rosen program was designed to create just such an opportunity. Each year the exhibition catalogue becomes more focused, informative, and beautiful. It is easy to understand how important the exhibition catalogue is to the viewer, but an overlooked importance is its role in the life of the artists. The exhibition catalogue is a working tool; it provides the artists with materials to present to prospective galleries and patrons. The catalogue can also impress upon people the strength of a public art program. Each artist exhibited on campus receives an honorarium to help meet the challenges of everyday life as an artist. Every year the program awards the Martin and Doris Rosen Award, and this large prize is designed to help the winner move their work/career to the next level. With this prize money, artists have bought much needed studio equipment, ordered materials for new work, taken research trips, and even helped finance better working facilities.

In recent years, we have worked hard to strengthen the program so that it better meets the needs of the above mentioned groups. We have increased the scope of the catalogue to include statements from the artists and juror. Also, we have added a new dimension to the catalogue by the use of color images. We have increased the amount of images in the catalogue to offer a more comprehensive view of each sculpture, and we have developed a strong website. This year's catalogue contains a new feature; the works represented in the exhibition are listed in numerical order by their site assignment. This makes it much easier to refer to the catalogue when touring the works. Last year we introduced the site specific sculpture category and featured two such works in the exhibition. This year we continue this expansion of the program and also feature two site specific works.

The Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition and Exhibition has become an integral part of the Appalachian State University experience. Each year as the previous installation comes down and the new works begin going up, we hear the responses of people passing by. "Oh, I really liked that one, I hate to see it go" or "Look at that, it's neat and strange, but neat." These casual responses remind us just how many people come in contact with these works over the years, and, more importantly, that they are involved in thinking about them. We invite you to explore, consider and enjoy these works.

Sherry Edwards

Sherry Edwards

This past year, Appalachian State University experienced the loss of one of its longtime educators and artists. The passing of Sherry Edwards is felt not only within the Art Department, but throughout the entire University. During her years at the University, Sherry influenced the lives of students, staff and faculty. Her jovial manner, and unwillingness to accept that there was anything she (or others) couldn't do were her hallmark. These traits led her to great accomplishments and earned her the respect of those around her. It is largely due to Sherry that there is a Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition and Exhibition. Through her belief that such a program would greatly benefit the campus and the artists, Sherry drew support for the program we enjoy today. We join with the entire Appalachian family in expressing our loss, but, more importantly, in joyfully remembering the lives touched by this artist and friend.
Hank T. Foreman
Director & Chief Curator
Turchin Center for the Visual Arts

About the Curator

Hank Foreman serves as Assistant Vice Chancellor of Arts and Cultural Affairs as well as Director and Chief Curator of the Turchin Center for the Visual Arts for Appalachian State University. He obtained his M.A. in Art Education from Appalachian, having completed undergraduate studies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, with a concentration in Painting and Sculpture. His duties include the administrative responsibilities for An Appalachian Summer Festival, the Performing Arts Series, Farthing Auditorium and the Turchin Center for the Visual Arts.

During his tenure at Appalachian State, Foreman has taken part in the organization of numerous exhibitions, including the associated lectures, symposia, and publications. He has worked closely with the university's Department of Art, and a wide variety of other campus and community groups, to make gallery resources available to all. One of his earliest exhibitions at Appalachian, Views From Ground Level: Art and Ecology in the Late Nineties, brought internationally acclaimed artists, historians, and critics to the campus and received national attention.

Foreman is also an exhibiting studio artist, and participates in regional and national conferences as a presenter and panelist.

Credits / Acknowledgements

On behalf of An Appalachian Summer Festival, the Office of Cultural Affairs, and the Catherine J. Smith Gallery, I wish to thank all of the artists who participated in this year's competition and congratulate those chosen for the exhibition. Each year the Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition and Exhibition is made possible by the generous support of Martin and Doris Rosen. The Rosens are tireless supporters of the arts, and over the years have given so much of themselves to ensure that the arts became a more integral part of our community. Their excitement and dedication serves as both inspiration and role model. I would like to thank our juror, Michael Dunbar, for his dedication and professionalism during the completion of his difficult task. I wish to thank my colleagues in the Office of Cultural Affairs, my colleagues in the Art Department, and the students who participated in the installations. Special thanks to our designer - Mike Fanizza, photographer - Troy Tuttle, Assistant to the Gallery Director - Kim Johnson, the folks at Boone Crane, and Jerry Clemens and the staff of Clemens Welding.

A heartfelt thanks to Jim Bryan - Grounds Superintendent, and to Evan Rowe - Safety Officer. We also extend our thanks to the entire Grounds and Electrical Department of the Appalachian State University Physical Plant. Their cooperation and expertise continues to make our campus a beautiful venue for outdoor sculpture.

Hank T. Foreman

Exhibits 1 - 10 of 10

Wisdom-Knowledge

Wisdom-Knowledge
Steel, Stone, and Found Objects

Joseph Thompson

13th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (1999-2000)
Rosen Award 1st Place

Award Winner
Support Where Most Needed

Support Where Most Needed
Wood, Steel, and Firehouse

Judy Strahota

13th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (1999-2000)
Juror's Award of Special Merit

Award Winner
Cathedral

Cathedral
Steel

Ann Melanie

13th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (1999-2000)

Channel Vessel

Channel Vessel
Carbon Steel

Adam Curtis

13th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (1999-2000)

Fool's Ship

Fool's Ship
Steel and Stones

Tim Kussow

13th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (1999-2000)

Gethsemane

Gethsemane
Limestone

Shawn Morin

13th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (1999-2000)

Jelly Belly

Jelly Belly
Steel

Greg Moring

13th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (1999-2000)

Leroy's Night Crawler

Leroy's Night Crawler
Mild Steel

Suzanne Fausette

13th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (1999-2000)

Process

Process
Cast Bronze and Found Objects

Rogelio Tijerina

13th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (1999-2000)

Temple VII

Temple VII
Steel

Fr Austin Collins

13th Rosen Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition (1999-2000)

Exhibits 1 - 10 of 10

Legend: Award Winner- Award Winner